Question:

 

I really only need a turf toe plate for my forefoot.  Do you have anything shorter?

 

Answer:

 

The Turf Toe Plate- Flat is the shortest and lightest turf toe plate that we offer.  The length is acutally critical for limitation of range of motion of the great toe joint.  You need the weight of the foot on the proximal portion of the plate to limit the range of motion of the great toe joint.  To limit the range of motion of the joint, you really don't want to go any shorter.

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Question:

I love this insole but it is constantly shifting towards my heel.  How do I keep it from sliding?

Answer:

We recommend holding it in place with some double sided sticky tape, once you get it place properly.

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Question:  

I'm an avid rock climber. Unfortunately, I have a rare cancer that will require amputation of my big toe from the last knuckle forward ("distal phalanx amputation"). Is there an insert that you think could help me climb after the amputation?

I would be prepared to modify an existing insert to fit, or have one custom-manufactured... Climbing is important to me. Thanks!

Answer:  

Really interesting question.  The thing about climbing shoes is that they’re a bit like ballet shoes in that you really want to be able to feel the surface that you’re on (the floor with ballet and the rock with climbing).  So how can you do that without a great toe?  

I spoke with my son who’s a climber about your question.  He explained to me that most ‘newer’ climbing shoes are designed with a slip last.  A slip last is a shoe design where the walls of the shoe, inside and out, come together in a single seam right down the middle of the shoe from the heel to the toe.  A slip last is great for this in that it wraps the foot (ballet slippers also use a slip last).  He said that many of the newer shoes are applied to the foot a bit like an Ace Wrap in that they use the slip last to wrap the foot and put rubber only on the ball of the foot and the toe.  The other downside of the newer design climbing shoes  is that there’s an intentional arch to the shoe that would preclude you from using any kind of arch support in the shoe.  I don’t think this style of shoe would be a good choice for you post amp.  

My son suggested either a big wall shoe or an approach shoe that would be a little more traditional without the focus on slip last design. In that case you could place either a flat turf to plate glued to the underside of the insole of the approach shoe or use a flat foot plate to line the entire bottom of the shoe.  

Another consideration is to have an orthotics and prosthetics shop place what’s called a toe plug on the insert.  The toe plug takes of the space vacated by the toe.  That’d be a must to have.  

Please let us know how this works out for you.  Both my son and I would appreciate how you solve this.  Watching him climb this past weekend makes me realize the challenge you have here.  Would love to hear how you solve this.